News

9 December 2014

Professor Akasaki’s Nobel lecture receives great applause

The Stockholm University Auditorium packed with audience
The Stockholm University Auditorium packed with audience

Meijo University Professor Akasaki attended the 2014 Nobel lectures presentation in the Stockholm University auditorium at around 9 a.m. on December 8 (5:00 p.m. Japan time). As it was the only official event open to the public, many citizens, young researchers, and students as well as Japanese and local reporters rushed into the hall. Some audience had to stand while listening to the laureates’ lectures.

Professor Akasaki, Nagoya University Professor Amano (a former Meijo professor), and University of California Santa Barbara Professor Nakamura delivered their Nobel lectures in that order. As the first speaker Professor Akasaki cleared the atmosphere by joking,“My name is Akasaki, Aka means red in Japanese, but today I’d like to talk to you about Blue Light!”.

Professor Akasaki remained seated while delivering his lecture due to his physical condition. His lecture lasted for about half an hour touching upon his research days when he tried to develop blue LEDs. He firmly and vividly described the moment when he realized gallium nitride p-n junction in 1989 for the first time, by saying,“The sight of the piercing blue light emission from the first-ever GaN p-n junction blue LED amazed me all over again.”

Following Professor Akasaki’s lecture, Professor Amano delivered his Nobel lecture. He walked around on the stage and sometimes used gestures while giving his lecture. As for having Professor Akasaki as his teacher since his student days at Nagoya University, he said, “I was lucky to have met Professor Akasaki.” He sent an enthusiastic message to young people by saying that they should also tackle difficult tasks. Lastly Professor Nakamura delivered his lecture sometimes by recounting episodes about his past research on LEDs. In one episode he said, “Back in those days conference presentations on Gallium–Nitride-based LEDs did not attract many researchers, and Professor Akasaki chaired a session whereas Professor Amano gave his presentation and I was there among several listeners.”

  • The auditorium stage where lectures were delivered
  • The auditorium stage where lectures were delivered
  • The Chair introducing three laureates
  • The Chair introducing the three laureates
  • Professor Akasaki looking around the hall while delivering his lecture
  • Professor Akasaki looking around the hall while delivering his lecture
  • Professor Akasaki introducing Professor Amano and other colleagues in his slides
  • Professor Akasaki introducing Professor Amano and other colleagues in his slides
  • Professor Amano getting in a car and saying, “My lecture was about 60 percent of what I had aimed at”
  • Professor Amano getting in a car and saying, “My lecture was about 60 percent of what I had aimed at”
  • Professor Akasaki and Professor Amano talking right before lectures
  • Professor Akasaki and Professor Amano talking right before the lectures
  • Professor Akasaki greeting the audience
  • Professor Akasaki greeting the audience
  • Young audience attending to Professor Akasaki’s lecture
  • Young audience attending to Professor Akasaki’s lecture
  • The audience giving laureates a standing ovation after their lectures
  • The audience giving laureates a standing ovation after their lectures
  • Surrounded by many reporters Professor Akasaki leaving the auditorium with smile.
  • Surrounded by many reporters Professor Akasaki leaving the auditorium smiling.

Meijo University President Nakane and other Meijo participants attend Nobel lectures

President Toshiharu Nakane, Professor Koichi Yoshihisa, Dean, Faculty of Science and Technology, and other Meijo participants were all present at the auditorium attending Professor Akasaki’s lecture. Professor Satoshi Kamiyama, Faculty of Science and Technology said, “In the presentation slides I could recognize many colleagues’ photos and names. I was greatly impressed by the lecture because it showed Professor Akasaki’s sincere personality in appreciating those who had helped his research.”
Ms. Junko Akasaki, Professor Akasaki’s second daughter said, “Because it was early in the morning I was a little worried that he might get sick in the middle of his lecture. So I was relieved to see him finishing his lecture successfully. And I was very happy to be able to watch my father’s proud moment so closely.”
When he three laureates appeared on stage again after their lectures, the audience gave them a standing ovation and applauded their achievements loud and long.